Jake’s Monthly Discoveries 35 – May 2021

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

5 songs, 24 min listening time

Spotify link

Deezer link

Music

1) “Dermot (See Yourself In My Eyes)” – Fred again.. – 0:00

In Fred again..’s debut album he shows how he can use simple snippets of sound combined with his understanding of music to produce something that invokes emotion. This is incredible and is perfectly demonstrated in this track that has been on repeat for me recently.

Album: “Actual Life (April 14 – December 17 2020)” (2021)
Label: Warner Music UK

Spotify link
Apple Music link
Deezer link

2) “Near Here” – sir Was – 3:48

I’ve been a fan of sir Was for a while now despite him only featuring on RunPip twice to date. Obviously not enough of a fan to go back and check out the 2016 EP that features this fantastic track! A corker and on a debut EP… something special.

EP: “Says Hi” (2016)
Label: City Slang

Spotify link
Apple Music link
Deezer link
Bandcamp link

3) “Hard Drive” – Cassandra Jenkins – 8:30

“Hard Drive” opens with a voice memo Jenkins recorded at The Met Breuer: a guard muses about Mrinalini Mukherjee’s hybrid textile and sculpture works, which were then on display in a retrospective titled “Phenomenal Nature”. Stuart Bogie’s saxophone and Josh Kaufman’s guitar make way for Jenkins’ spoken word which includes scenes from her life: an art exhibit, a bookshop, a driving lesson, and a friend’s birthday party. It is a terrific track that needs to be listened to a few times to understand why it’s so good.

Album: “An Overview on Phenomenal Nature” (2021)
Label: Ba Da Bing!

Spotify link
Apple Music link
Deezer link
Bandcamp link

4) “All There” – JW Francis – 13:56

As mentioned in the weekly album suggestions, who doesn’t like a fun, laidback lofi track? That entertaining riff accompanied by the strums that thread their way through the song is delightful and clever. It puts a smile on my face. 

Album: “We Share a Similar Joy” (2020)
Label: Sunday Best Recordings

Spotify link
Apple Music link
Deezer link
Bandcamp link

5) “We Found It” – MydBakar – 17:13

Eccentric talent Myd released his debut album “Born a Loser” just a few weeks ago. I stumbled across the cracking track “We Found It” featuring Bakar and this led me to discovering the album. Despite seeming quite simple, chill and repetitive I have found myself playing it over and over and enjoying it each time. An interesting feature not making use of Bakar’s full vocals but I like that. 

Album: “Born a Loser” (2021)
Label: Ed Banger Records

Spotify link
Apple Music link
Deezer link
Bandcamp link

Books

1) “Bullshit Jobs” (2019) – David Graeber

I’ve been disillusioned by the past three jobs I’ve had. So much so I did a rant post that I almost posted to RunPip. Perhaps I’ll have the guts to post it one day accompanied by an angry soundtrack. 

Nevertheless, Charles recommended I read this book and although it hasn’t improved the world of work and the purposelessness of it in the context of the many world problems it did show me that there are many others (as much as 60%) doing bullshit jobs. This clearly isn’t right but it was refreshing that David Graeber was able to put something into words that I had been feeling for a long time. If you’re dissatisfied with your work read it. If you’re not read it anyway as you are probably oblivious to the pointlessness of a lot of it and that’s worrying.

Publisher: Penguin

World of Books link

Films

1) “Mayor” – David Osit

Mayor is a documentary following Musa Hadid, the Christian mayor of Ramallah in Palestine. Taking place across a number of months including Christmas, Trump moving the embassy to Jerusalem and a visit from Prince William it demonstrates how difficult local government is under oppression. The Mayor manages to keep his cool in the most extreme circumstances and this is a metaphor for the Palestinian population as a whole considering all they have to live through.

I’m not often a fan of documentaries but this moved along nicely and dealt with its subject matter well. 

Mubi link

2) “Brazil” (1985) – Terry Gilliam

This dystopian sci fi film came at the right time for me. Along with David Graeber’s Bullshit Jobs book above it helped me to understand I’m not the only one finding no meaning in work. 

In 1985 it was predicted that people would generally be doing nothing in offices and instead turning to their screens to watch films whenever their managers looked away! (Therefore it predicted the rise of streaming and bullshit jobs!) Alongside an interesting cast of Jonathan Pryce and Robert De Niro it is a crazy, oddball film that makes you wonder how we headed for this nothingness we find ourselves in when people predicted it. 

A film to make you think. It is sexist in some ways with just a handful of female characters to the male ones and none of the female leads being part of the hierarchy of work.

Production companies: Embassy International PicturesBrazil Productions

Mubi link